Unseen Passages for Class 7

Reading comprehension is the act of understanding what you are reading. In this post, we have added the top 10 quality Unseen Passages for Class 7. Unseen Passages for Class 7 with questions and answers.

Important Tips:

  • Students should read Comprehension Passages thoroughly.
  • Read Passages several times, if needed.
  • For short types of answers try to answer in one or two sentences.
  • Be careful about what the questions precisely ask.
Unseen Passages for Class 7

Unseen Passages for Class 7


#1 Unseen Passages for Class 7


Read the following stanzas and answer the questions which follow:

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake
The only other sound’s the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.

Questions

(a) Complete the following sentences with information from the passage:

(i) The horse shakes the harness bells to ask……………………………………..

(ii) The poet cannot stop long by the woods because………………………..

(iii) Before going to bed the poet has……………………………………

(b) Answer the following questions :

(i) Which line suggests that the poet is travelling in a carriage?

(ii) What sounds can the poet hear?

(iii) Pick out the line which describes the beauty of the woods.

Answers

(a)

(i)…………the poet if he stops by the woods on a cold snowy evening by mistake.
(ii)………………he has promises to keep.
(iii)…………….to travel miles.

(b)

(i) “He gives his harness bells a shake”.

(ii) The poet can hear the sounds of the sweep of the wind and of the snowfall.

(iii) “The woods are lovely, dark and deep”.


#2 Unseen Passages for Class 7


Florence Nightingale was born on 12th May 1820 in Florence in Italy. Since her childhood her interest in nursing was evident. Then she would spend time nursing her injured dolls and animals Gradually she grew into a handsome young lady, and she could have married some excellent young man and enjoyed life.

But she remained unmarried and devoted her life to nursing the poor and sick people. When the Crimean war broke out between England and Russia. She went to the field with a number of nurses. There they nursed the sick and wounded soldiers. Florence Nightingale worked there without rest and many times she was nursing the poor ailing soldiers throughout the night with a candle in her hand. So, she was known everywhere as “The Lady with the Lamp”.

Questions

(a) When and where was Florence Nightingale born?

(b) How was her interest evident in nursing in childhood?

(c) Why did she remain unmarried in her life?

(d) What did she do when the Crimean war broke out?

(e) Why was she known as “The Lady with the Lamp”?

Answers

(a) Florence Nightingale was born on 12th May 1820 in Florence in Italy.

(b) Her interest in nursing was evident in her childhood. Then she would spend time nursing her injured dolls and animals.

(c) She remains unmarried in her life to nurse poor and sick people.

d) When the Crimean war broke out she went to the war field with a number of nurses to nurse the sick and wounded soldiers. In the Crimean war field, she worked many times without rest throughout the night with a candle in her hand. So, she was known as “The Lady with the Lamp’.

Also, Read Short Unseen Passages with Questions and Answers


#3 Unseen Passages for Class 7


The clothes after the Bombay cut that I was wearing were, I thought, unsuitable for English society, and I got new ones at the Army and Navy stores. I also went in for a chimney-pot hat costing nineteen shillings-an excessive prices in those days. Not content with this, I wasted ten pounds on an evening suit made in Bond Street, the centre of fashionable life in London; and got my good and noble-hearted brother to send me a double watch chain of gold.

It was not correct to wear a ready-made tie and I learned the art of tying one for myself. While in India, the mirror had been a Luxury permitted on the days when the family barber gave me a shave. Here I wasted ten minutes every day before a huge mirror, watching myself arranging my tie and parting my hair in the correct fashion.

My hair was by no means soft, and every day it meant a regular struggle with the brush to keep it in position. Each time the hat was put on and off, the hand would automatically move towards the head to adjust the hair, not to mention the other civilized habit of the hand every now and then operating for the same purpose when sitting in polished society.

Questions

(a) Why did the writer get new clothes? (b) What other articles did the writer boy? (c) How did the writer dress?

Answers

(a) The writer used to wear clothes after the Bombay cut. He now thought these were not fit for English society. So he bought new clothes at the Army and Navy stores.

(b) The writer got a chimney-pot hat for nineteen shillings and an evening suit made in Bond Street at a cost of ten pounds. He also made his brother send him a double watch chain of gold.

(c) As wearing a ready-made tie was not correct, the writer the art learned the art of tying his neck-tie himself. He wasted ten minutes every day before a huge mirror arranging his tie and hair in the correct fashion. As his hair was not soft he had to struggle hard with his brush and comb to keep it in position. When he would put on and off his hat hand would automatically move up to adjust his hair.


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#4 Unseen Passages for Class 7


Read the following passage and answer the questions which follow:

It works in me like madness to bid me say goodbye,

For the seas call, and the stars call, and oh! the call of the sky!

I know not where the white road runs, nor what the blue hills are,

But a man can have the sun for a friend, and for his guide a star;

Questions

(a) What works in the poet like madness? (b) Who is calling the poet to bid goodbye? (c) Who are the poet’s guide and friends?

Answers

(a) The longing for travel works like madness in the poet.

(b) The seas, the stars, the sky, the white road, and the blue hills call the poet.

(c) A star is the poet’s guide and the sun is his friend.


#5 Unseen Passages for Class 7


In a small cottage in a Japanese village there once lived an old in named Hagamuchi with his family. The cottage stood at the top of a low hill overlooking the sea. Hagamuchi was alone with his grandson. The rest of the family had gone to the town at the foot of the hill to make merry with their friends on a festival day.

Suddenly Hagamuchi thought that he noticed something unusual about the sea. The sea had been rough all day long, but now the water seemed lower than usual. At last, he saw in the distance, a great tide coming swiftly towards the land. He called to the people below but they were so busy enjoying themselves that no one heard his voice. Suddenly a thought struck him. He set fire to the thatched roof of his own cottage. His purpose was served.

At once, the temple bell was rung below the hill. People left their merry-making. Within a few minutes, there came leaping a great roaring wave and it destroyed the whole town. Only the people who flocked to save the old man and his grandson from the fire were saved. These people felt so grateful to Hagamuchi that they built a temple in his memory.

Questions

(a) Who was Hagamuchi?
(b) What did happen one day when he was alone with his grandson?
(c) What did he notice about the sea? (d) What did he do to warn the people? (e) What did the people do to show their gratitude to him?

Answers

(a) Hagamuchi was an old man who lived in a Japanese village. (b) One day he noticed something unusual about the sea.

(c) Suddenly Hagamuchi noticed that in the distance, a great tide coming swiftly towards the land.

(d) To warn the people he set fire to his own thatched-roof cottage.
(e) For showing gratitude to Hagamuchi, people built a temple in his memory.

Also, Read Introduction to Comprehension


#6 Unseen Passages for Class 7


I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said:—Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them on the sand,
Half sunk, a shatter’d visage lies, whose frown
And wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamp’d on these lifeless things,
The hand that mock’d them and the heart that fed.
And on the pedestal these words appear:
“My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair!”
Nothing beside remains: round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare,
The lone and level sands stretch far away.

Questions

Q1) The poem is set in ______.
a. The wilderness
b. An ancient land
c. A palace
d. A desert

Q2) The expression on the face of the statue is one of ______.
a. Admiration
b. Anger
c. Despair
d. Contempt

Q3) Find words from the passage that mean
i. Face
ii. Mock

Q4) What was the sculptor able to read well?

Q5) ‘The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed.’ Whose hand and heart has the poet called in this line?

Q6) ‘Nothing beside remains.’ What does the narrator mean when he says these words?

Q7) What is your impression of Ozymandias as a king after reading the poem?

Q8) Identify the figure of speech in the line The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed.

Answers

A1) The poem is set in a desert.

A2) The expression on the face of the statue is one of contempt.

A3)
i. Face: Visage
ii. Mock: Sneer

A4) The sculptor was able to read the feelings of Ozymandias and sculpt them perfectly on his statute.

A5) The sculptor‘s hands and heart are being called in the respective line. The sculptor must have copied the inner feelings of Ozymandias while making the statue.

A6) When the time comes, everything has to meet its end. Thus, the trunkless legs and a shattered visage are all that one can see of the once-grand statue in the vast desert.

A7) The poem suggests that Ozymandias may have been a cruel and angry king who was a tyrant who ruled with an iron fist.

A8) The figure of speech in the line The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed is a synecdoche, part of the whole.


#7 Unseen Passages for Class 7


About a hundred years ago, whenever an operation was performed, the patient suffered tearful pain as he felt the surgeon cut into his flesh. But now severe operations have been carried out without pain, and thousands of lives have been saved. James Simpson was the first to discover and use the pain-killing power of chloroform. James was born into a poor family. So in boyhood, he had not only to help his father during the holidays but also assist the village doctor.

But he was horrified at the terrible suffering of the people who came to the hospital for treatment. He now made it his aim in life to find out new discoveries which would prevent so much pain. Simpson made many experiments and ultimately discovered chloroform. Now the patient does not dread an operation.

Questions

(a) Why did patients suffer tearful pain when an operation was performed in the past?

(b) Who discovered chloroform?

(c) What did he do in his boyhood?

(d) What made him horrified?

(e) How did he make his discovery?

Answers

(a) In the past patients suffered fearful pain at the time of operation as they felt the surgeon cut into their flesh.
(b) James Simpson discovered chloroform.
(c) In his boyhood, he used to assist the village doctor in the holidays.
(d) He was horrified at the terrible suffering of the people who came to the hospital for treatment.
(e) Simpson made many experiments and ultimately discovered chloroform.

You may read Read the Passage and Answer the Questions


#8 Unseen Passages for Class 7


In an effort to remove the anti-export bias. Of existing policies, the Government has made steady progress in eliminating quantitative restrictions, licensing, and discretionary control over imports since 1991. Imports of capital goods, raw materials, and components have been delicensed. Tariffs on such imports have been reduced substantially. Tariff categories have been reclassified.

To give a fillip to indigenous manufacturers of capital goods and improve the power situation, the supply of capital goods to the power sector has been made eligible for a refund of terminal excise duty.

To encourage the eradication of child labour, the export of hard-knitted carpets and floor coverings was again subjected to the production of Registration-Cum-Membership Certificate from the Carpet Export Promotion Council.

Questions

(a) Why has Government eliminated quantitative restrictions and controls over imports?
(b) What changes have been brought about in imports?
(c) Why has the supply of capital goods to the power sector been made eligible for a refund of terminal excise duty?
(d) What has been done to encourage the eradication of child labour?

Answers

(a) The Government has eliminated quantitative restrictions and controls over imports in an effort to remove anti-export bias.

(b) The following changes have been brought about in imports.
(i) Imports of capital goods, raw materials, and components have been delicensed.
(ii) Tariff on such imports has been reduced substantially.

(c) Tariff categories have been reclassified.

(d) To give a fillip to indigenous manufacturers of capital goods and to improve the power situation the supply of capital goods to the power sector has been made eligible for a refund of terminal excise duty.

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#9 Unseen Passages for Class 7


Once upon a time, there was a very old man. His eyes were d His ears were useless for hearing and his knees trembled. Often spilt his food over the tablecloth and sometimes down his clothes At this, his son and daughter-in-law were vexed. They gave him his meals in an earthless dish. This made him very sad. His eyes were moistened with tears. One day the dish fell on the ground and broke into pieces. The young daughter-in-law scolded him.

But he did not reply and only signed. After that, they bought him a wooden dish for a few paise. He had now to eat out of that. One day his little grandson was fitting together some pieces of wood. “What are you making”, asked the old man. “I am making it father and mother to feed out when I grow big”. His parents heard this and they were ashamed of their conduct. Then they behaved well with the old man.

Questions

(a) How do we know that the grandfather was old and weak?

(b) Why did his son and daughter-in-law give him food in an earthen dish?

(c) What made the old man grow sad?

(d) Why did the daughter-in-law scold him?

(e) Why did the little boy make the wooden trough?

Answers

(a) We know that the grandfather was old and weak because his eyes were dim, his ears were useless for hearing and his knees trembled.

(b) His son and daughter-in-law gave him food in an earthen dish because he often spilt his food over the tablecloth and sometimes down his clothes.

(c) His son and daughter-in-law gave him his meals in an earthless dish. This made him very sad.

(d) One day the dish fell on the ground and broke into pieces. So the daughter-in-law scolded him.

(e) The little boy made the wooden trough to feed his father and mother when he would grow big.

Also, Read What is Reading Comprehension?


#10 Unseen Passages for Class 7


I am one of those who love the desert. It brings peace to my mind after the daily battle for one’s bread. When I am tired of fighting the green countryside does not allow me to forget my worries; everywhere I can see flowers and trees, birds and beetles continuing the restless struggle before my eyes, each trying hard to win even if its own life is the death of another.

In the desert, however, the sun is the master; all else retires before its merciless rays. Only where there is water does the earth of the desert gives a rich home to trees and flowers; but one has to go a long way to find water in a desert, otherwise, it would not be a desert so those who love the peace of a treeless and grassless place can stand on the top of a rocky hill and see nothing around them but the sunbaked desert. With no signs of effort or passion to disturb them. Then strengthened in spirit, with rested nevers and a peaceful mind. They can return to the battle for existence in the towns.

Questions

(a) Why does green countryside not allow the writer to forget his worries?

(b) Where do trees and flowers grow well on desert earth?

(c) When those who love the peace of a treeless and grassless peace return to the towns, how are they different from when they went to the desert?

(d) Why does the writer prefer the desert to green places?

(e) Explain briefly what you understand by the two phrases given below :
(i) The daily battle for one’s bread. (ii) Its own life is the death of another.

Answers

(a) The green countryside does not allow the writer to forget his worries because everywhere the author finds flowers and trees. birds and beetles struggling for survival at the cost of the other creatures.

(b) In the desert earth, trees and flowers can grow and blossom only. Where there is water, which is not easily found in the desert.

(c) Those who love the peace of a treeless and grassless place, before going out to the desert are weak in spirit. Tense in nerves and disturbed in mind, but after going out to the desert they are strengthened in spirit, with rested nerves and a peaceful mind.

(d) The author prefers the desert to green places because the desert brings peace to his bread, but the green countryside does not allow him to forget his worries.

(e) (i) ‘The daily battle for one’s bread’ means the everyday work that a person does to earn his livelihood.
(ii) ‘Its own life is the death of another’ means any creature or species that survives and lives because it has won the struggle for existence against the other. And the other one gets annihilated.

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