Comprehension Passages with Questions and Answers

In this post, we have added the top 10 Comprehension Passages with Questions and Answers. Students should read Comprehension Passages thoroughly.

Read Passages several times, if needed. For short types of answers try to answer in one or two sentences. Be careful about what the questions precisely ask.

Comprehension Passages with Questions and Answers

Comprehension Passages with Questions and Answers


Comprehension Passages with Questions and Answers #1


Read the following passage and answer the questions below:

The approach of 6 August is always hard for 63 years old Reiko Yanada, an atomic bomb survivor is now active in a battle to gain better support for victims of the world’s first atomic blast 52 years ago.

Ms. Yanada recalls all too clearly that mid-summer day in 1945 when US warplanes dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima. A second atomic bomb was dropped by the USA on the southwestern city of Nagasaki three days later, forcing Japan to surrender to the allied forces and bringing the Pacific war to an end. More than 1,40,000 people were killed instantly after the nuclear blasts and many more died in the months and years after. Victims continue to die each year from cancer and radiation-linked illnesses.

Today Ms. Yanada is part of a group called Japan Confederation of A & H Bomb Sufferers, made up of survivors like her struggling for a fair deal in life. In Japan, a vast number of people are still lobbying the government to give them the status they have been denied for so long. Ms. Yanada’s group makes frequent visits to the offices of the influential members of the district.

A large number of people are asking for an end to this bureaucratic red-tapism and waiting for identification cards. But their demands have not been fulfilled by the government.

During the past few years, this criticism of the government’s approach has been echoed by survivors living overseas. Many of them are Japanese, Korean, and Chinese who left Hiroshima and Nagasaki after the disaster.

Questions

A. state whether the following sentences are True or False. Write T’ for True and ‘F’ for False. [You need not write the sentences. Write only the numbers.] 1×4=4

  1. An atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki on 9th August 1945.
  2. Reiko Yanada is an atomic bomb survivor who witnessed the dropping of the first atomic bomb.
  3. Immediately after the nuclear blasts, one million died on the spot.
  4. The government has agreed to fulfil the demand of the sufferers.

Answer each of the following questions in about 30 words: 2 x 3=6

  1. Where was the first atomic bomb dropped? How is it affecting people even today?
  2. Who left Hiroshima and Nagasaki after the disaster? What is their reaction to the government’s approach to the survivors?
  3. What compelled Japan to surrender to the allied forces? How did the Pacific war come to an end?

Answers

A. 1. T 2. T 3. F 4. F

B. 1. The first atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima in Japan. Even today, victims are dying from cancer and radiation-linked illnesses.

2. Many survivors of the atomic blasts are Japanese, Korean, and Chinese who left Hiroshima and Nagasaki after the disaster. They are critical of the government’s approach to the survivors.

3. The dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki by US warplanes compelled Japan to surrender to the allied forces. This surrender brought the pacific war to an end.


Comprehension Passages with Questions and Answers #2


Read the following passage and answer the questions below:

Long long ago, a tortoise and a fox were great friends. The tortoise lived in a pond. The fox lived in a den on the banks of a river They spent a lot of time talking to each other. They loved to tell each other stories.

The fox often went through a forest to a village nearby in search of food. He met many other animals in the forest. But he always kept away from the lion, the tiger, the leopard, and the wolf.

“They are very dangerous and cunning,” he told the tortoise. “They will grab me and eat me up if I go near one of them.” The tortoise knew this, too.

One day, the fox was telling the tortoise an interesting story. A leopard crept up slowly behind him. The fox did not see the leopard coming. But the tortoise saw him.

“Run, fox!’ she shouted and the fox turned and ran away. But the tortoise was not so lucky. The leopard grabbed her before she could jump back into the pond.

“Ah! I am going to have a fine meal today,” the leopard thought.

He tried to break the shell of the tortoise. But it was very hard. He bit it, put his paws on it, and scratched at it with his claws-but he could not break it at all. Inside the shell, the tortoise was shivering with fear.

Just then, she heard her friend’s voice. “I can tell you how to get the tortoise out of her shell!” the fox shouted.

“How?” roared the angry leopard.

“Why don’t you throw her back into the water?” said the fox. “Her shell will soak in the water and become soft. Then you can break it open easily,” he said.

“You are right, said the leopard, “Thank you for the idea.”

He picked up the tortoise and threw her back in the water. The fox ran away. The tortoise sank to the bottom and did not come up for many days.

The next time the two friends met, they were very happy together. But they also told each other, “We must always be very careful in the forest.” [adapted from Folktales of India, edited by A.K. Ramanujan]

Questions

A State whether the following sentences are True or False. Write T for True and ‘F’ for False. [You need not write the sentences.
Write only the numbers.] 1×4=4

  1. The tortoise went to nearby villages in search of food.
  2. The tortoise and the fox spent a lot of time fighting.
  3. The tortoise saved the fox from the leopard. The fox and the tortoise saved each other’s life.

B. Answer each of the following questions in about 30 words: 2×3=6

  1. Who are the three main animal characters in the story? How did the fox and the tortoise spend their time?
  2. Why did the fox always keep away from some animals?
  3. Why did the leopard throw the tortoise into the water?

Answers

A. 1. F 2. F 3. T 4. T

B. 1. The fox, the tortoise, and the leopard are the three main animal characters in the story. The fox and the tortoise spent their time talking to each other and telling stories.

2. The fox kept away from dangerous and cunning animals like the lion, the tiger, the leopard, and the wolf as they would grab him and eat him up.

3. The leopard believed the fox’s suggestion that the water would soak the tortoise’s shell and make it soft. Then he would be able to break it and eat the tortoise.


Comprehension Passages with Questions and Answers #3


Read the following passage and answer the questions below:

May in Ayemenem is a hot, brooding month. The days are long and humid. The river shrinks and black crows gorge on bright mangoes in still, dust-green trees. Red bananas ripen. Jackfruits burst. Dissolute bluebottles hum vacuously in the fruity air.

Then they stun themselves against clear windowpanes and die, fatly baffled in the sun. The nights are clear but suffused with sloth and sullen expectations.

But by early June the southwest monsoon breaks and there are three months of wind and water with short spells of sharp, glittering sunshine that thrilled children snatch to play with.

The countryside turns an immodest green. Boundaries blur as tapioca fences take root and bloom. Brick walls turn mossgreen. Pepper vines snake up electric poles. Wild creepers burst through laterite banks and spilt across the flooded roads. Boats ply in the bazaars. And small fish appear in the puddles that fill the PWD potholes on the highways. It was raining when Rahel came
back to Ayemenem.

Slanting silver ropes slammed into loose earth, ploughing it up like gunfire. The old house on the hill wore its steep, gabled roof pulled over its ears like a low hat. The walls, streaked with moss, had grown soft and bulged a little with dampness that seeped up from the ground. The wild, overgrown garden was full of the whisper and scurry of small lives.

In the undergrowth, a rat snake rubbed itself against a glistening stone. Hopeful yellow bullfrogs cruised the scummy pond for mates. A drenched mongoose flashed across the leaf-strewn driveway. The house itself looked empty. The doors and windows were locked. The front verandah bare. Unfurnished.

But the sky blue Plymouth with chrome tail fins was still parked outside, and inside, Baby Kochamma was still alive. She was Rahel’s baby grandaunt, her grandfather’s younger sister. Her name was really Navomi, Navomi Ipe, but everybody called her Baby. She became Baby Kochamma when she was old enough to be an aunt. Rahel hadn’t come to see her, though.

Neither niece nor baby grandaunt laboured under any illusions on that account. Rahel had come to see her brother, Estha. They were two-egg twins. “Dizygotic’ doctors called them. Born from separate but simultaneously fertilized eggs. Estha Esthappen-was the older by 18 minutes. [Source: Arundhuti Ray’s The God of Small Things]

Questions

А. State whether the following sentences are True or False. Write T for True and ‘F’ for False. [You need not write the sentences. Write only the numbers.] 1x 4 = 4

  1. In Ayemenem the monsoon starts in early June and continues for five months.
  2. In Ayemenem the nights are clear but suffused with sloth and sullen expectation during May.
  3. Rahel and Estha were dizygotic twins.
  4. The sky was clear when Rahel came back to Ayemenem.

B. Answer each of the following questions in about 30 words: 2×3=6

  1. What did a rat snake do in the undergrowth? Which animal is the snake’s enemy?
  2. What was Baby’s real name? How was she related to Rahel?
  3. Why had Rahel come to Ayemenem? Name the car mentioned in the passage.

Answers

А. 1. F 2. T 3. T 4. F

B. 1. In the undergrowth, a rat snake rubbed itself against a glistening stone. The Mongoose is the snake’s enemy.

2. Baby’s real name was Navomi lpe, but everybody called her Baby. She was Rahel’s baby grandaunt, her grandfather’s younger sister.

3. Rahel had come to see her brother., Estha. The car mentioned in the passage is a sky-blue Plymouth with chrome tailfins.


Comprehension Passages with Questions and Answers #4


Read the following passage and answer the questions below:

The morning after my teacher came, she led me into her room and gave me a doll. The little blind children at the Perkins Institution had sent it and Laura Bridgman had dressed it, but I did not know this until afterwards. When I had played with it a little while, Miss Sullivan slowly spelt into my hand the word d-O-HL. I was at once interested in this finger play and tried to imitate it. When I finally succeeded in making the letters correctly, I was flushed with childish pleasure and pride.

Running downstairs to my mother, I held up my hand and made the letters for the doll. I did not know that I was spelling a word or even that words existed; I was simply making my fingers go in monkey-like imitation. In the days that followed, I learned to spell in this uncomprehending way a great many words, among them cup and a few verbs like sit, stand and walk. But my teacher had been with me for several weeks before I understood that everything has a name.

One day while I was playing with my new doll, Miss Sullivan put my big rag doll into my lap, also spelt, d-o-l-l, and tried to make me understand that d-o-l-l applied to both. Earlier in the day, we had had a tussle over the words m-u-g and w-a-t-e-r.

Miss Sullivan had tried to impress upon me that m-u-g is a mug and that w-a-t-e-r is water, but I persisted in confounding the two. In despair, she had dropped the subject for the time, only to renew it at the first opportunity. I became impatient at her repeated attempts and seizing the new doll, I dashed it upon the floor.

Questions

A. State whether the following sentences are True or False. Write T for True and ‘F’ for False. [You need not write the sentences.
Write only the numbers.] 1×4=4

  1. The doll was dressed by Miss Sullivan.
  2. The narrator was only making a monkey-like imitation while spelling the words.
  3. The narrator was happy at the repeated attempts of Miss Sullivan.
  4. The narrator took some time to understand that everything has a name.

B. Answer each of the following questions in about 30 words:

  1. Who made the doll for the narrator? What did the narrator do with the doll later? 2×3=6
  2. How did the narrator’s teacher first teach her to spell?
  3. Why did Miss Sullivan and the narrator have a fight?

Answers

A. 1. F 2. T 3. F 4. T

B 1. The little blind children at the Perkins Institution made the doll for the narrator. Later, the narrator dashed the doll upon the floor out of anger and frustration.

2. Miss Sullivan spelt the word d-o-l-l in the narrator’s hand. Interested in the fingerplay, the narrator imitated it. Thus, the narrator learned to spell a word.

3. Miss Sullivan had a fight over the words ‘mug’ and ‘water’. Miss Sullivan had tried to teach the narrator that m-u-g was a mug
and w-a-t-e-r was water. But the narrator became confused.


Comprehension Passages with Questions and Answers #5


Read the following passage and answer the questions below:

A tractor made in Bengal may help India shed bullocks from farms.

One of the world’s smallest tractors, developed in a government laboratory in Durgapur and made especially for farmers with small landholdings, has passed field tests and is ready for production and rollout.

The tractor named Krishi Sakti, developed by engineers at the Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute (CMERI), has just received certification under the Central Motor Vehicle Rules and will be produced by Howrah-based Singha Components, a private company.

‘The 12 horsepower mini-tractor will cost less and demand lower operating cost than standard tractors used in farms and will allow farmers with small patches of land to mechanize tilling and ploughing operations’, a CMERI scientist said.

Indian agricultural statistics suggest that 80 per cent of the farming households across the country hold 36 per cent of the cultivated land. The average landholding of an Indian farmer does not exceed the size of a soccer field.

Standard tractors used in Indian farms are larger at 18 horsepower or higher. These tractors cost about Rs 4 lakhs or higher and consume three to four litres of diesel per hour of operation. Krishi Sakti, on the other hand, is expected to be priced below Rs 2 lakhs and will work on less than two litres of diesel per hour.

The CMERI engineers say that the tractor could also be used to draw a trolley carrying up to 2500 kg of load. It was also reported that it took a 12-year research effort to develop the new tractor. [Source: The Telegraph]

Questions

State whether the following sentences are True or False. Write T for True and ‘F for False. [You need not write the sentences. Write only the numbers.] 1×4=4

  1. The new tractor is developed by the scientists of CMERI
  2. The new tractor is more fuel consumption than the bigger tractors.
  3. The new tractor is specially produced for farmers with small land holdings.
  4. The tractor can be used to draw trolleys loaded up to 2500 kg.

B. Answer each of the following questions in about 30 words: 2×3=6

  1. What is the name of the small tractor developed at CMERI? Who will be its producer?
  2. How much-cultivated hand is held by 80% of the farmers? How big is the average landholding of an Indian farmer?
  3. What are the main advantages of employing the new tractor in the field?

Answers

A. 1. F 2. F 3. T 4. T

B. 1. The name of the small tractor developed at CMERI is Krishi Sakti. Singha Components, a Howrah-based private company, would produce the tractor in the market.

2. 36% of the cultivated land is held by 80% of the farmers. The average landholding of an Indian farmer does not exceed the size of a soccer field.

3. The tractor will work nicely on small patches of land and will require less fuel than the big tractors. It is also easy to handle.


Comprehension Passages with Questions and Answers #6


Read the following passage and answer the questions below:

An MBBS student, interning at SSKM Hospital, died today. His batchmate is reported to be fighting for his life. Saptarshi Das, a meritorious student was found terribly ill by his other batchmates and juniors at 9.30 pm. His friend, Shahbaaz Siddiqui, was found unconscious in his room.

Saptarshi died at 12.40 pm after all efforts to save his life failed. Mr. Pradip Mitra, the Director of the Institute of Post-Graduate Medical Education and Research, said that probably the mishap was caused due to an overdose of a cocktail of drugs.

He also informed me that he has convened a hostel committee meeting on Monday to discuss how drugs could find a way into the hostel. A student has to rank within 650 to get a place in SSKM. Almost 45000 students appear at the Joint Entrance Exam to crack a place in the medical course. It is unfortunate that students with such merit waste their lives by taking drugs. Saptarshi was extremely popular among his friends. He did a fantastic job one night when a bus overturned at Kidderpore and Saptarshi was the lone doctor in the emergency to take care of the injured. He was also a good sportsman excelling in different forms of games.

Saptarshi’s death is being investigated by the police. An officer said that two syringes were found in the room of Saptarshi, containing a milky white liquid. The contents, however, can be determined only after a forensic test. He also said that the police are trying to find out the source of where the students get drugs. It is lamentable that the hostel has no warden and therefore there is no question of supervision. There is also little budget for deploying guards at the gates.

Questions

State whether the following sentences are True or False. Write T for True and ‘F for False. [You need not write the sentences.
Write only the numbers.] 1x 4=4

  1. Saptarshi Das was extremely popular as a student.
  2. Saptarshi died at 9.30 pm.
  3. Drugs are quite easily available at the medical students’ hostel.
  4. There are guards on every floor of the students’ hostel.

Answer each of the following questions in about 30 words: 2×3=6

  1. What are the names of the two students who were affected by drugs? What was the main cause behind the death of Saptarshi?
  2. Who is the director of the Institute of Post-Graduate Medical Education and Research? Why will there be a hostel committee meeting?
  3. How did Saptarshi show his excellence as a medical student?

Answers

1. T 2. F 3. T 4. F

B. 1. The two students affected by drugs were Saptarshi Das and Shabhaaz Siddiqui. The main cause behind Saptarshi’s death was an overdose of a cocktail of drugs.

2. Mr. Pradip Mitra is the Director of the Institute of Post-Graduate Medical Education and Research. There will be a hostel committee meeting to discuss how drugs found their way into the hostel.

3. Saptarshi did an excellent job when he was the only doctor available at the emergency one night. He attended the people injured in a bus accident at Kidderpore.


Comprehension Passages with Questions and Answers #7


Read the following passage and answer the questions below:

Christopher Marlowe, the son of Marlowe who is described as the clerk of St Mary’s in the city of Canterbury, was born in the year 1564. He received his early education at The King’s School in that city. He took the degrees of B.A. and M.A. in 1583 and 1587 respectively from Cambridge University. He started writing poems and became a renowned dramatist in the Admiral’s Company.

Marlowe is known as one of the university wits, a group of dramatists along with Robert Greene, Thomas Nash, and George Peele. Marlowe is considered the greatest precursor to Shakespeare. When Marlowe came upon the English stage, the nature of drama was undeveloped. The verses in the dramas were lifeless. But Marlowe gave English drama an appropriate meter, diction, and method. It is really a matter of speculation what kind of greatness he would have achieved if his life had not been terminated (C++) in a duel after a brawl in a tavern (inn).

The literary life of Marlowe had a short span, from 1587 to 1593. During this period, he wrote five plays which were all tragedies as he had no comic vein. His tragedies like Dr. Faustus, The Jew of Malta, and Edward Il are rated as some of the best works of the Elizabethan age. He also wrote an unfinished poem Hero and Leander and translated some parts of Ovid’s (a Roman Poet) elegies.

Marlowe’s subjects are mostly heroic which appeals to the imagination of the play-goers. His heroes epitomize the spirit of the Renaissance. Each of them embodies a passion and tries to achieve lies in his development of the blank verse. He put it at any cost. But Marlowe’s chief contribution aside from the old rhyming lines then employed in the plays and used blank verse. Thus, the language of drama was brought closer to real life and drama was made ready for Shakespeare (1564-1616) to improve upon it. It is rightly said, “No Marlowe, no Shakespeare”.

Questions

A State whether the following sentences are True or False. Write T’ for True and ‘F’ for False. [You need not write the sentences. Write only the numbers.] 1×4=4

  1. Marlowe translated some works of Ovid, the great Latin poet.
  2. Marlowe wrote for a short period of time.
  3. Marlowe discarded rhyming in his drama.
  4. Marlowe wrote a number of comedies.

B. Answer each of the following questions in about 30 words: 2×3= 6

  1. When was Christopher Marlowe born? What was his chief contribution to drama?
  2. Who were the other university wits along with Marlowe?
  3. Describe Marlowe’s heroes.

Answers

A. 1. T 2. T 3. T 4. F

  1. Christopher Marlowe was born in the year 1564. Marlowe gave English drama an appropriate meter and diction. This blank verse brought life to English drama.
  2. The other University wits were Robert Greene, George Peele, and Thomas Nash.
  3. Marlowe’s heroes epitomized the Renaissance spirit. Each embodied a passion and tried to achieve it at any cost.

Comprehension Passages with Questions and Answers #8


Read the following passage and answer the questions below:

A well-dressed man or ‘hurgo’ as they called him, climbed up on the stage and cried out three words ‘Langro Dehul San’! Fifty inhabitants came forward and cut the string on the left side of my head so that I could turn and observe the speaker.

He made a long speech with many actions of threat, promise, pity, and kindness. I mumbled a few words in response and showed obedience and meek actions and pointed to the sun as my witness and promised that I would not hurt them. I then conveyed to them how hungry I was. Going against proper manners, I even put my fingers frequently to my mouth to show them that I was desperate for food!

The hurgo or the great lord understood me very well. A hundred tiny men mounted and walked towards my mouth with baskets full of meat. I noticed that there was the meat of several animals no smaller than a lark but could not distinguish them by taste. I ate them in two or three mouthfuls with bread, the size of musket bullets. They supplied me as fast they could, shouting in wonder and astonishment at my huge appetite. I then made another sign that I wanted a drink.

The clever people skilfully pushed up one of their largest barrels, rolled it towards my mouth, and knocked out the cap. I drank the liquid off in a gulp. It held only half a pint. I made signs for more, but they had none to give me. Filled with delight and admiration at my appetite, they danced upon my breast and repeated several times ‘Hekinah Degul’.

To be honest, I was tempted to seize forty or fifty of these people and dash them against the ground. But the memory of their arrows and the promise of honour I had made them, prevented me. These people treated me with so much kindness. Surely, I owed them some gratitude for their hospitality.

Questions

State whether the following sentences are True or False. Write T’ for True and ‘F’ for False. [You need not write the sentences. Write only the numbers.] 1x 4×4

  1. The narrator made signs of desperation to show that he was hungry.
  2. The narrator dashed the brains of many people.
  3. The narrator was delighted at the courage of the little people.
  4. The narrator felt hungry even after he was supplied with the meal.

B. Answer each of the following questions in about 30 words: 2×3=6

  1. How did the narrator know that the hurgo’s speech was full of threat, pity, and promise?
  2. Why did the narrator call the people clever people? What astonished them?
  3. How did the people help the narrator to drink?

Answers

A. 1. T 2. F 3. F 4. F

B. 1. The hurgo was making many gestures of threat, promise, pity, and kindness by which the narrator could fathom the contents of his speech.

2. The little people could easily understand the signs made by the narrator and so the narrator concluded that those people were clever enough. The narrator’s huge appetite astonished them.

3. The little people skilfully pushed up one of their largest barrels, rolled it towards the mouth of the narrator, and then knocked out the cap so that the narrator could drink the liquid inside.


Comprehension Passages with Questions and Answers #9


Read the following passage and answer the questions below:

The Health Department in South Dinajpur has opened its first Nutrition Rehabilitation Centre at the district hospital in Balurghat.

The Centre was inaugurated by the local MLA and Minister for Prisons Mr. Sankar Chakraborty on March 10. The centre was built with 40 lakhs, a Health Department official said.

The centre has been set up as a separate ward with 10 beds. Children between six months and six years will be looked after here by five trained attendants and one medical officer.

South Dinajpur is among the most underdeveloped districts in Bengal. Large sections of the Muslim and tribal population in the district live in utter poverty. The literacy level is very low too. Malnutrition is rampant in the village.

“The mothers will also get treatment and nutrition from the centre. The children and their mothers will be provided food from the centre’s separate kitchen and not from the general kitchen of the hospital,” says Kajal Kanti Das, the Chief Medical Officer of Health (CMOH) in South Dinajpur.

The centre, which is yet to admit any patients, will take in children as well as their mothers, for they suffer severely from lack of nutrition. An allowance will be given to the mother whose child is admitted.

At the centre, the children’s BMI will be checked and a supplementary diet will be given including multivitamins, folic acid, and magnesium sulfate. The dietician will decide how many calories a child should take in. The children will be screened for thalassemia. The Minister also inaugurated a fair-price shop at the district hospital.
[Based on a report in The Telegraph on April 29, 2013]

Questions

А. State whether the following sentences are True or False. Write ‘T’ for True and ‘F for False. [You need not write the sentences.
Write only the numbers.] 1×4=4

  1. Both children and adults will get treatment in the newly opened centre.
  2. Malnutrition is quite common among the people of South Dinajpur.
  3. Thalassaemia can be detected at the newly opened centre.
  4. The mothers of the children getting admitted will get a lot of benefits from the centre.

Answer each of the following questions in about 30 words: 2×3=6

  1. Where has the first Nutrition Rehabilitation Centre been established? What was the cost?
  2. What benefits will the mothers get from the centre? What will be the functions of the dietician in the centre?
  3. How will the children benefit from the centre?

Answers

A. 1. F 2. T 3. T 4. T

B. 1. The Nutrition Rehabilitation Centre has been established at the district hospital Balurghat in South Dinajpur. The cost was Rs. 40 Lakhs.

2. The mothers of the children will also get food, medicine, and even an allowance. The dietician will prescribe how many calories a child requires.

The children’s BMI will be checked. They will be tested for thalassemia. A supplementary diet including multivitamins, folic acid, and magnesium sulfate will be given.


Comprehension Passages with Questions and Answers #10


Read the following passage and answer the questions below:

After dinner, my friends in the neighbouring rooms in the hostel dropped in as usual for light talk. They were my colleagues. One was Rangappa who taught the boys philosophy, and the other was Gopal of the mathematics section. Gopal was sharp as a knife edge where mathematical matters were concerned, but poor fellow, he was very dumb and stupid in other matters. As a matter of fact, he paid little attention to anything else. We liked him because he was a genius, and in a vague manner, we understood that he was doing brilliant things in mathematics. Some day he hoped to contribute a paper on his subject which was going to revolutionize human thought and conceptions.

But God knew what it was all about. All that I cared for in him was that he was an agreeable friend, who never contradicted and who patiently listened for hours, though without showing any sign of understanding.

Tonight the talk was all about English spelling, and the conference we had with Brown. I was incensed as usual, much to the amazement of Rangappa. “But my dear fellow, what do you think they pay you for unless it is for dotting the i’s and crossing the t’s?” Gopal, who had been listening without putting in a word of his own, suddenly became active.

“I don’t follow you,” he said.
“I said the English department existed solely for dotting the i’s and crossing the t’s.”
“Oh!” he said, opening wide his eyes. “I never thought so. Why should you do it?” His precise literal brain refused to move where it had no concrete facts or figures to grip. Symbols, if they entered his brain at all, entered only as mathematical symbols.

Rangappa answered: “Look here, Gopal. You have come across the expression ‘Raining cats and dogs’?”
“Yes.”
“Have you actually seen cats and dogs falling down from the sky?”
“No, no. Why?”

Rangappa would have worried him a little longer, but the college clock struck ten and I said:
“Friends, I must bid you good night.”
“Good night,” Gopal repeated mechanically and rose to go. [Source: R.K. Narayan’s The English Teacher]

Questions

А. State whether the following sentences are True or False. Write T for True and ‘F’ for False. [You need not write the sentences.
Write only the numbers.] 1x 4=4

  1. Gopal was interested in all branches of knowledge.
  2. Rangappa was a teacher of mathematics.
  3. Gopal patiently listened for hours and never contradicted
  4. The author bade good night at 10 p.m.

B. Answer each of the following questions in about 30 words: 2×3=6

  1. What would the author and his friends usually do after dinner? What did they talk about that night?
  2. Why, according to Rangappa, did the English department exist? What did the author feel about his friend’s opinion?
  3. Why, couldn’t Gopal understand what was being said?

Answers

A. 1. F 2. F 3. T 4. T

B. 1. After dinner, the author and his friends would usually have a light talk together. That night the author and his colleagues talked about English spelling and the conference they had with Brown.

2. According to Rangappa, the English department existed solely for dotting the i’s and crossing the t’s. The author did not agree with his friend’s opinion.

3. Gopal couldn’t understand what was being said because his precise, literal brain could understand only concrete facts and figures.

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