Janmashtami

Janmashtami is a Hindu festival celebrated for the birth of Lord Shri Krishna Vasudev, the eighth avatar of Lord Vishnu. It is celebrated with great zeal and enthusiasm throughout India.

Janmashtami is celebrated on the eighth day of Krishna Paksha in the month of Bhadrapada in the Hindu calendar which falls in August or September.

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Shri Krishna Janmashtami

Story of Janmashtami


With a rich historical significance, Janmashtami holds great importance in the hearts of Hindus. Approximately 5,200 years ago, Lord Krishna was born in the city of Mathura, located in present-day Uttar Pradesh, India. Lord Krishna was the eighth son of Devaki and Vasudev, and during his birth, his parents were imprisoned by the malevolent King Kansa of Mathura. To protect the newborn Krishna from Kansa’s evil intentions, Vasudev entrusted him to his cousin Nanda. Thus, Krishna was raised in the loving care of Nanda in Gokul. Over time, Krishna grew strong and ultimately defeated the wicked Kansa.

As the most powerful incarnation of Lord Vishnu, Lord Krishna descended upon Earth with a significant purpose—to free the world from evil. His role in the epic Mahabharata was of utmost importance, and he preached the principles of good karma and Bhakti, emphasizing the path of devotion.


Janmashtami Celebrations


Janmashtami is celebrated with boundless enthusiasm and joy by Hindus worldwide. It is known by various names across India, such as Ashtami Rohini, Srikrishna Jayanti, Krishnashtami, Saatam Aatham, and Gokulashtami. On this sacred day, Hindus observe fasting and recite verses from the holy scripture, Bhagwad Gita, to seek spiritual enlightenment.

In our society, Janmashtami is an annual celebration filled with immense delight and enthusiasm. The entire community comes together to adorn their surroundings with vibrant lights. Temples are beautifully decorated with colorful electric lights, flowers, and other ornamental elements. Elderly women gather in the society park to sing devotional songs, known as Bhajans, dedicated to Lord Krishna.

Given Krishna’s fondness for butter, the tradition of Dahi Handi is enjoyed during this festival. Children from society participate energetically in the Dahi Handi contest. In his childhood, Krishna was famously known as the “butter thief” or “Makhan chor” due to his mischievous nature and love for butter. He and his group of friends would playfully steal butter from their neighbors.


Conclusion


Janmashtami brings people together, regardless of their wealth or social status, to engage in a multitude of activities. Celebrants rejoice in the company of friends, relatives, and neighbors, participating in lively dancing, singing, and exchanging gifts. The youth actively engage in functions organized by the society, partaking in singing and dancing competitions, where they joyfully perform to songs dedicated to Lord Krishna. Society heads award prizes to the winners, fostering motivation and encouragement.

Ultimately, Janmashtami serves as a source of inspiration and guidance, encouraging individuals to lead righteous and meaningful life. It reminds us of the eternal principles of truth, love, and devotion, which can guide us toward a path of inner fulfillment and spiritual awakening.


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