Diwali Par Essay

Diwali is the biggest and one of the most famous and light-hearted festivals celebrated by billions of people.

It is celebrated with great zeal and enthusiasm throughout India and by also Indians in foreign countries.

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Essay on Diwali

Diwali Par Essay


Diwali Par Essay (250 Words)


Diwali, widely regarded as one of the most prominent and joyous festivals, holds immense significance for billions of people. Celebrated with fervor and excitement, this festival of lights is embraced not only in India but also by Indians residing in various parts of the world. Diwali, known as the festival of lights, represents the triumph of good over evil.

Observed in the months of October and November, Diwali occurs twenty days after the festival of Dussehra. It serves as a remarkable occasion for Hindus to rejoice and engage in merriment. One of the key traditions associated with Diwali is the purchase and donning of new clothes, symbolizing fresh beginnings and auspiciousness. As the evening sets in, households are illuminated with a dazzling array of tube lights, clay lamps called diyas, and candles. These luminous displays are intended to dispel darkness, eradicate negativity, and invite the presence of deities.

According to Hindu beliefs, Goddess Lakshmi, the embodiment of wealth, is believed to visit homes during Diwali, blessing them with prosperity. Consequently, Hindus worship Lakshmi, light candles and diyas at their doorways, and keep their doors open as a warm welcome to the goddess.

Diwali’s magnificence extends to every corner of India and transcends borders, resonating with Indians residing in foreign lands. This festival serves as a unifying force, fostering a sense of togetherness and communal harmony. India has been celebrating this festival for thousands of years and continues to celebrate it even today.


Diwali Par Essay (400 Words)


India, known as the land of festivals, embraces its cultural diversity, faith, and religious beliefs, uniting people of various religions. Among the numerous celebrations, Diwali stands out as the grandest and most renowned festival, celebrated by billions of individuals. This joyous occasion, known as the festival of lights, holds a special place in the hearts of Hindus and is observed with immense zeal and enthusiasm throughout India and by Indians residing overseas. Diwali serves as a symbol of the victory of good over evil.

Occurring in the months of October and November, Diwali follows Dussehra by a span of twenty days. It holds tremendous significance as it signifies the triumph of righteousness. One of the cherished customs during Diwali is the purchase and adornment of new garments, symbolizing fresh beginnings and prosperity. As dusk descends, homes come alive with a radiant display of tube lights, clay lamps called diyas, and candles. These illuminations serve the purpose of dispelling darkness, warding off negativity, and welcoming deities.

According to Hindu beliefs, Goddess Lakshmi, the bestower of wealth, is believed to grace homes during Diwali, showering blessings of prosperity. As a result, Hindus worship Lakshmi, lighting candles and diyas at their doorsteps, and leaving their doors open to invite the goddess into their abodes.

Diwali brings immense joy and enthusiasm to people’s lives. It fosters closeness among loved ones and strengthens bonds. The festival is celebrated with great delight, accompanied by the preparation of various homemade sweets that are distributed among friends and relatives. Invitations are extended to near and dear ones, and visits are made to relatives and friends, where gifts and dry fruits are exchanged. People come together, hosting parties at their homes or workplaces, indulging in dance, song, gift exchange, and relishing delectable feasts.

Diwali, the festival of lights, holds significance for the entire nation. Its roots lie deep within Hindu mythology, emphasizing the importance of true happiness and inner peace. It symbolizes the victory of good deeds and serves as a day of joy, happiness, and triumph over evil. Celebrated with unparalleled enthusiasm in every town and city of India, as well as by Indians abroad, Diwali becomes a unifying force. For thousands of years, India has honored and preserved the traditions of this festival, continuing to celebrate it with unbridled enthusiasm to this day.


Diwali Par Essay (500 Words)


India, renowned as the land of festivals, thrives on its cultural diversity, deep-rooted faith, and religious beliefs cherished by people from various backgrounds. Among the multitude of celebrations, Diwali shines as the grandest and most beloved festival, captivating the hearts of billions. This exuberant occasion, often referred to as the festival of lights, is embraced with boundless enthusiasm and fervor across the nation and by Indians residing in foreign lands. Diwali, predominantly celebrated by Hindus, holds the distinction of being the largest and most widely observed festival in India. It signifies the triumph of good over evil and is celebrated in the months of October and November, marking the conclusion of the festival of Dussehra.

The history of Diwali is rooted in Hindu mythology, revolving around the epic tale of Lord Rama, the incarnation of the deity Vishnu. Lord Rama, son of the ruler Dashratha of Ayodhya, was a valiant warrior king. However, due to the machinations of his stepmother, Dashratha compelled Rama to embark on a fourteen-year exile. Demonstrating unwavering devotion to his duty, Rama willingly acquiesced to his father’s decree. His wife, Sita, and his loyal brother, Lakshman, accompanied him into the forest.

Towards the end of their exile, Ravana, the formidable king of Lanka, became captivated by Sita’s beauty. He abducted her and took her to Lanka. In response, Rama and Lakshman journeyed to Lanka to rescue Sita, aided by Hanuman, the greatest devotee of Lord Rama. Rama vanquished Ravana and successfully brought back his beloved wife. Upon their return to Ayodhya, their kingdom, the people joyously illuminated the entire city with rows of clay lamps and celebrated with fireworks. This event symbolizes the honoring of Lord Rama’s victory over Ravana, signifying the triumph of good over evil.

In contemporary times, the spirit of Diwali resonates with similar fervor. People indulge in the purchase and donning of new clothes, symbolizing fresh beginnings and prosperity. As twilight descends, homes are adorned with radiant tube lights, clay lamps called diyas, and candles, signifying the eradication of darkness and the welcoming of deities. According to Hindu beliefs, Goddess Lakshmi, the deity of wealth, is believed to visit homes during Diwali, bestowing prosperity upon those who welcome her. In light of this belief, Hindus worship Lakshmi, lighting candles and diyas at the entrance of their homes, and keeping their doors open as a gesture of invitation to the goddess.

Diwali fills people’s hearts with immense joy and enthusiasm. It serves as a unifying festival, bringing loved ones closer. The day is marked by the preparation of various homemade sweets, shared among friends and relatives. Invitations are extended to near and dear ones, and visits are made to relatives and friends, exchanging gifts and dried fruits.

Diwali is a festival that transcends regional boundaries, embracing the entire nation. It holds immense significance in Hindu mythology, imparting profound lessons about genuine happiness and inner peace. It stands as a festive tribute to the victory of good over evil. Diwali becomes a symbol of unity, fostering a sense of togetherness among diverse communities. For thousands of years, India has celebrated this cherished festival, and even today, Diwali continues to illuminate the hearts and homes of its people.


Diwali Par Essay (600 Words)


India is known as the land of festivals because of its cultural diversity, faith, and religious beliefs among people of different religions. One of the most prominent and joyous festivals celebrated by billions of individuals is Diwali, also known as the festival of lights. Celebrated with immense zeal and enthusiasm throughout India and even by Indians residing in foreign countries, Diwali holds a special place in the hearts of Hindus. Typically falling in the months of October or November, Diwali occurs twenty days after the festival of Dussehra and signifies the triumph of good over evil.

Diwali’s roots can be traced back to Hindu mythology. According to ancient tales, Lord Rama, an incarnation of the God Vishnu, was the son of Dashratha, the ruler of Ayodhya. Lord Rama, a valiant warrior king, was forced into a fourteen-year exile by his stepmother’s scheme. Devoted to his duty as a son, Lord Rama accepted the exile without hesitation. His wife, Sita, and brother, Lakshman, stood by his side and accompanied him to the forest.

Towards the end of their exile, Ravana, the powerful king of Lanka, became captivated by Sita’s beauty and abducted her, taking her to Lanka. In response, Rama and Lakshman embarked on a mission to rescue Sita, aided by Hanuman, Lord Rama’s greatest devotee. Eventually, Lord Rama vanquished Ravana and successfully rescued his beloved wife. Upon their return to Ayodhya, the people warmly welcomed Rama, Sita, and Lakshman by illuminating the entire city with rows of clay lamps and setting off fireworks. This grand celebration symbolized the triumph of Lord Rama over Ravana, representing the victory of good over evil.

In present times, Diwali is celebrated with a similar spirit. People begin preparations fifteen days in advance, cleaning and decorating their homes. New clothes are bought and worn on this auspicious day. As evening approaches, houses are adorned with tube lights, clay lamps (known as diyas), and candles, symbolically dispelling darkness and inviting the presence of deities. According to Hindu beliefs, Goddess Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth, is believed to visit homes and bestow prosperity. To welcome the goddess, Hindus worship Lakshmi, light candles and diyas at their doorways, and leave their doors open.

Diwali brings immense joy and enthusiasm to people’s lives. It serves as an occasion to strengthen bonds with loved ones. Sweets are prepared at home and distributed among friends and relatives. Invitations are extended to near and dear ones, and visits to relatives and friends are made, accompanied by the exchange of gifts and dry fruits.

However, Diwali celebrations also come with certain drawbacks. Due to carelessness, accidents can occur while bursting crackers, resulting in harm to individuals and damage to property. Additionally, the smoke and noise generated by fireworks can pose health problems and contribute to increased pollution levels. Government authorities often advise caution and encourage the use of environmentally-friendly alternatives, such as sky candles, while discouraging the use of firecrackers.

Diwali transcends regional and religious boundaries, making it a festival celebrated across the entire country. It represents the triumph of good over evil and instills faith in performing virtuous deeds. Diwali is a day of happiness, joy, and the eradication of negativity. It is celebrated with great fervor in every town and city of India, as well as by Indians residing abroad. As a festival that unites people, Diwali has been cherished in India for thousands of years and continues to be celebrated with unwavering enthusiasm today.


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