Diwali Par Essay in English

Diwali is the biggest and one of the most famous and light-hearted festivals celebrated by billions of people. It is celebrated with great zeal and enthusiasm throughout India and by also Indians in foreign countries.

Diwali generates belief in good deeds and marks a day of happiness, joy, and the end of evilness.

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Essay on Diwali

Diwali Par Essay in English


Diwali Par Essay in English (200 Words)


Diwali, celebrated by billions of people, is India’s grandest and most renowned festival, known for its joyous and vibrant atmosphere. It is widely observed by Hindus and Indians residing in foreign countries. Often referred to as the “Festival of Lights,” Diwali signifies the triumph of good over evil.

Occurring in the months of October and November, approximately 20 days after the festival of Dussehra, Diwali holds immense significance. On this auspicious day, people adorn themselves in new attire. As evening descends, homes are illuminated with tube lights, clay lamps called diyas, and candles, symbolizing the eradication of darkness and the welcoming of gods and goddesses. According to Hindu beliefs, Goddess Lakshmi, the deity of wealth, is said to visit households and bless them with prosperity. To honor this belief, Hindus worship Lakshmi, light candles and diyas at their doorsteps, and leave their doors open as a gesture of welcome.

Diwali is celebrated with unparalleled enthusiasm in every town and city across India, as well as by the Indian diaspora around the globe. It serves as a unifying symbol, bringing people together in celebration. Having been observed for thousands of years, Diwali continues to hold immense cultural and traditional significance in India, enduring as a cherished festival to this day.


Diwali Par Essay in English (300 Words)


Diwali, known as the festival of lights, holds a significant place in India, the land of festivals, owing to its cultural diversity, religious beliefs, and faith among people of different religions. Celebrated by billions of people, Diwali stands as the biggest and most renowned festival in the country. It is observed with immense enthusiasm and fervor across India and by the Indian diaspora worldwide. Diwali, occurring in the months of October and November, typically falls 20 days after the festival of Dussehra and symbolizes the victory of good over evil.

During Diwali, people adorn themselves in new clothes, illuminating their homes with tube lights, clay lamps called diyas, and candles, aiming to dispel darkness and welcome the deities. According to Hindu religious beliefs, Goddess Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth, is believed to visit homes on this auspicious occasion to bestow prosperity. Consequently, Hindus worship Lakshmi, light candles and diyas at their doorsteps, and keep their doors open to invite the goddess.

Diwali brings immense joy and excitement to people’s lives. It fosters a sense of togetherness and strengthens bonds with loved ones. On this day, various homemade sweets are prepared and shared with friends and relatives. Inviting near and dear ones, visiting relatives and friends, exchanging gifts and dry fruits, organizing parties at home or workplaces, dancing, singing, and relishing delicious dinners are all integral parts of the Diwali celebrations.

Being a festival celebrated nationwide, Diwali holds great significance in Hindu mythology and emphasizes the importance of true happiness and tranquility. It represents the triumph of good deeds and signifies a day of joy, happiness, and the eradication of evil. Diwali is observed with extraordinary enthusiasm in every town and city in India and by the Indian diaspora worldwide, serving as a symbol of unity. For thousands of years, India has rejoiced in this festival and continues to do so, preserving its rich traditions and customs.


Diwali Par Essay in English (500 Words)


India, renowned as the land of festivals, thrives on its cultural diversity, deep-rooted faith, and religious beliefs cherished by people from various backgrounds. Among the multitude of celebrations, Diwali shines as the grandest and most beloved festival, captivating the hearts of billions. This exuberant occasion, often referred to as the festival of lights, is embraced with boundless enthusiasm and fervor across the nation and by Indians residing in foreign lands. Diwali, predominantly celebrated by Hindus, holds the distinction of being the largest and most widely observed festival in India. It signifies the triumph of good over evil and is celebrated in the months of October and November, marking the conclusion of the festival of Dussehra.

The history of Diwali is rooted in Hindu mythology, revolving around the epic tale of Lord Rama, the incarnation of the deity Vishnu. Lord Rama, son of the ruler Dashratha of Ayodhya, was a valiant warrior king. However, due to the machinations of his stepmother, Dashratha compelled Rama to embark on a fourteen-year exile. Demonstrating unwavering devotion to his duty, Rama willingly acquiesced to his father’s decree. His wife, Sita, and his loyal brother, Lakshman, accompanied him into the forest.

Towards the end of their exile, Ravana, the formidable king of Lanka, became captivated by Sita’s beauty. He abducted her and took her to Lanka. In response, Rama and Lakshman journeyed to Lanka to rescue Sita, aided by Hanuman, the greatest devotee of Lord Rama. Rama vanquished Ravana and successfully brought back his beloved wife. Upon their return to Ayodhya, their kingdom, the people joyously illuminated the entire city with rows of clay lamps and celebrated with fireworks. This event symbolizes the honoring of Lord Rama’s victory over Ravana, signifying the triumph of good over evil.

In contemporary times, the spirit of Diwali resonates with similar fervor. People indulge in the purchase and donning of new clothes, symbolizing fresh beginnings and prosperity. As twilight descends, homes are adorned with radiant tube lights, clay lamps called diyas, and candles, signifying the eradication of darkness and the welcoming of deities. According to Hindu beliefs, Goddess Lakshmi, the deity of wealth, is believed to visit homes during Diwali, bestowing prosperity upon those who welcome her. In light of this belief, Hindus worship Lakshmi, lighting candles and diyas at the entrance of their homes, and keeping their doors open as a gesture of invitation to the goddess.

Diwali fills people’s hearts with immense joy and enthusiasm. It serves as a unifying festival, bringing loved ones closer. The day is marked by the preparation of various homemade sweets, shared among friends and relatives. Invitations are extended to near and dear ones, and visits are made to relatives and friends, exchanging gifts and dried fruits.

Diwali is a festival that transcends regional boundaries, embracing the entire nation. It holds immense significance in Hindu mythology, imparting profound lessons about genuine happiness and inner peace. It stands as a festive tribute to the victory of good over evil. Diwali becomes a symbol of unity, fostering a sense of togetherness among diverse communities. For thousands of years, India has celebrated this cherished festival, and even today, Diwali continues to illuminate the hearts and homes of its people.


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